Student Work

Design For Industry 2019 Graduates

Here is a selection of projects from this years cohort…

Danielle Coffey / Sapu / John Lewis Collaborative Project

Danielle Coffey / Sapu / John Lewis Collaborative Project

SAPU / / Danielle Coffey has developed a proposal for reducing the amount of household fats, oils and grease (FOGs) that pollute and damage our water systems. Sápu is a kitchen product that offers householders a quick and easy way to filter, collect and repurpose used FOGs into soap. The design confronts a common issue of what to do with these waste byproducts of home cooking, which are typically washed down the sink and contribute to water pollution or infrastructure issues such as fatbergs.

Sápu was designed in response to a brief set by the Room_Y innovation department at John Lewis. Students were asked to develop a proposal that exploits untapped or neglected resources in the urban environment as a way of addressing the challenges of climate change, population growth and dwindling resources.

Coffey’s research identified that FOG blockages are responsible for around 80 per cent of water-system issues, and approximately £100 million worth of damage to systems and the environment. Households incorrectly disposing of pollutants are the biggest contributor to blockages in the water system. Sápu aims to improve future water quality by instilling behavioural changes that will encourage correct disposal or reuse of FOGs.

The design features a three-part polypropylene filter that the FOGs are poured into before being mixed with lye and water in the main compartment. The resulting fluid can be combined with herbs or spices, and is then distributed into moulds to solidify and form a soap for everyday household use. Sápu’s form and materials echo the visual language of common kitchen products, and its components can be easily separated for cleaning. The product represents a simple, practical and intelligent option for improving water quality through the correct disposal of FOGs.

Danielle Coffey - Sápu addresses one of the most pressing issues of tomorrow’s world: water pollution. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to the sink disposal method, the concept encourages homeowners to collect their own FOG waste and transform it into natural soap. The techniques used are both traditional and safe and can be easily personalised by introducing organic additives such as essential oils, herbs, rinds and seeds.

Jamie Pybus / Fungi Factory / John Lewis Collaborative Project

Jamie Pybus / Fungi Factory / John Lewis Collaborative Project

FUNGI FACTORY / / Jamie Pybus has developed a kit that allows users to grow oyster mushrooms at home using their waste coffee grounds as a growing medium. Fungi Factory is a system that promotes a new use for the increasing volume of coffee grounds that are discarded by UK households. The group of four products is used to grow and process edible mushrooms in just four weeks.

Fungi Factory was designed in response to a brief set by the Room_Y innovation department at John Lewis. Students were asked to develop a proposal that exploits untapped or neglected resources in the urban environment as a way of addressing the challenges of climate change, population growth and dwindling resources.

Pybus identified that of the 95 million cups of coffee consumed every day in the UK, up to 65 per cent are consumed at home. This leads to an enormous amount of waste coffee grounds, which actually retain up to 99 per cent of their original nutritional value after use. The coffee grounds are a perfect fertile medium for growing mushrooms, and the Fungi Factory system aims to make this process straightforward for home users.

The designer collaborated with YMCA Newcastle’s Urban Mushrooms initiative during the research phase of his project. The organisation collects coffee grounds from cafes around the city and uses them to grow mushrooms in unused urban spaces. Pybus’s project applies the same concept in a domestic context and provides users with the tools to produce their own mushrooms.

The system comprises four products that combine to put the raw coffee waste to good use. Loose coffee grounds or waste from single-use pods are inserted into a storage container and mycelium spawn is introduced, which then germinates and begins to form the mushrooms. Adjusting the carbon-dioxide levels inside the fruiting environment helps to keep the mushrooms healthy for up to three fruiting cycles. The output from this process includes the oyster mushrooms, as well as mushroom stems called chog that can be processed using a grinder and then formed into mushroom burgers. The matured mycelium can also be composted or harvested and moulded to create durable products for use in the home.

Jamie Pybus - The concept helps to highlight possibilities of waste recycling within the home by bringing the often unseen, circular economy into the hands and control of people. The Fungi Factory is environmentally rewarding through its recycling, whilst providing an equally significant benefit to people’s healthy eating habits.

Shrinking space-intensive processes into a home-sized product is vital to the success of local manufacturing and food production. I really wanted to create a system that was visually interesting and could get both adults and children interested in the product’s function and potential benefits. I want to communicate the importance of recycling waste produce and demonstrate the environmental and health benefits that can be gained within the home.

Harry Jones / Life / Final Major Project

Harry Jones / Life / Final Major Project

LIFE / / Harry Jones has developed a proposal for a fashion label aimed at drawing attention to the struggles faced by refugees seeking to enter Europe. The range of lifestyle products is manufactured from life vests used by refugees during sea crossings, and was created to heighten our appreciation for the dangers these people face.

Jones set himself the brief of portraying the plight of refugees in a positive way. He also sought to highlight the environmental crisis currently facing the planet through the choice of materials used to create the products. The project looks to draw attention to the ongoing refugee crisis affecting countries such as Syria, Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon. The designer wanted to provoke an emotional response by confronting users with familiar objects that are adapted and subverted so that they take on a new and more profound meaning.

Jones created a brand called LIFE that aims to raise funds to support people in need through the sale of lifestyle products and clothing with a clear and powerful message. The collection titled Ghostly Ocean Debris utilises lifejackets washed up on European beaches as the raw material for products such as flip flops, placemats, laptop cases and satchels. Rather than becoming landfill, the life jackets are given a new life and the proceeds from their sale help to support this important cause.

LIFE also manufactures its own range of clothing and accessories using organic and ecological materials including natural dyes and faux leather made from food waste. The branding for LIFE and the Ghostly Ocean Debris collection employs a colour palette that evokes the colours found on life jackets, and any additional materials used are clearly marked as recycled.

Harry Jones - The aim of this project is to provoke an emotional reaction in an audience and raise awareness about the ongoing refugee crisis. Theoretically, for this project to be successful it has to go out of business. This would mean that the problem has been resolved and refugees are no longer taking the treacherous crossing over the Mediterranean Sea, leaving lifejackets washed up on the beaches of Europe.

Rocky Brooks / Dog Goes Here / Final Major Project

Rocky Brooks / Dog Goes Here / Final Major Project

DOG GOES HERE / / Rocky Brooks has created a dog bed for use in rescue centres that is affordable, environmentally friendly and fully recyclable. Dog Goes Here offers an alternative to the plastic dog beds currently used in pet rescue centres, which are often damaged by anxious dogs and need to be disposed of regularly. The clever cardboard product is easy to assemble and can be recycled when a replacement is required. Its low unit price helps to alleviate the high cost of replacing beds within the dog rescue environment.

Brooks’ research identified that the average cost of the plastic beds currently found in the majority of rescue homes is £10-15. For centres housing up to 50 dogs at a time, the cost of replacing beds that can be ruined after just a few days or even hours can quickly add up to a significant amount.

Dog Goes Here is easy to store and cheap to replace, helping rescue centres to focus their funds on other aspects of the dog’s care, without compromising its comfort. Based on quotes from manufacturers, it is anticipated that the bed could be produced at a cost of less than £2 per unit (based on 1,000x units), meaning each bed can be sold at a fraction of the cost of current beds in use.

The flat-pack cardboard dog bed is cut, folded and printed from a single piece of recycled cardboard. It comes with a fully recycled paper sleeve that is removed and disposed of before folding the bed into shape and adding the required bedding. In just three simple steps, the pre-folded cardboard net is transformed into a three-dimensional bed that can be labelled with the dog’s name.

Three different sizes ensure there is a suitable bed for each individual animal. The bed can be recycled if it gets damaged, or once a new home has been found for its occupant.

Rocky Brooks - Hygiene and costs are of critical importance in dog rescue centres. The use of cheap yet robust recyclable materials combined with a purposefully short lifespan means this product could improve the lives of not only the dogs, but also the staff of the rescue centres.

Tom Jones / Northern Powerhouse / Final Major Project

Tom Jones / Northern Powerhouse / Final Major Project

NORTHERN POWERHOUSE / / Tom Jones has created a collection of display-ware featuring tones and textures that reference the architectural heritage of cities in the north of England. Designed during Jones’ final year of study at Northumbria University, the Northern Powerhouse Collection is a response to increasing globalisation within modern design.

Jones’ products physically manifest his pride in the aesthetic grandeur of northern cities. He was inspired by the sweeping curve of sandstone buildings that form Grey Street in Newcastle, and began exploring ways of translating the material palette of different cities into objects that provoke an emotional response.

Each of the objects is based on a defining characteristic of a city within the Northern Powerhouse, which is the name given to a group of core cities in the north of England. These urban areas were central to the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries, and are the focus of more recent efforts to boost economic growth in the region. Each city played a different role, resulting in purpose-built architecture that gives the cities their own unique character. Jones’ collection specifically references Newcastle, Manchester and Liverpool.

The designer used Jesmonite to accurately replicate the dominant construction materials found in each city. The composite material is produced using additives that can be altered to create different affects, which enabled Jones to accurately replicate the look and feel of Georgian sandstone pillars or terracotta bricks. It was cast in moulds with abstract patterns that introduce a three-dimensional texture to the pieces. The result is a collection of usable objects with a subtle decorative character that evokes the common characteristics of each city.

Tom Jones - I made the Northern Powerhouse collection as a response to the growing globalisation of the design industry. I wanted to create something with a clear identity and appreciation for locality. By making use of my surroundings, I tried to give a recognisable connection between person and place within the objects, which evokes an emotional response from people.

Design for Industry 2018 Graduates

Here is a selection of the final major projects from this year's cohort...

Ashley Willard / DAY + DUSK / Final Major Project

Ashley Willard / DAY + DUSK / Final Major Project

DAY + DUSK / / Day + Dusk paired lamps that employ hues of daylight: a cool white day lamp for productive tasks and a warmer, more sedative dusk lamp to help instil tranquility.

A limited quantity of light must be consciously shared between the two sources to suit the user’s state of being. Challenging the archetype of a lamp, this provokes a more considered and efficient approach to lighting design, challenging current trends of overuse and under appreciation.

Clara Meyer / VITALY / Final Major Project

Clara Meyer / VITALY / Final Major Project

VITALY / / This project aims to build a strategy that shows where pharmacies should position themselves in the future when online services define the market, in order to stimulate debate and discussion.

Considering current challenges and trends, the future strategy proposes three future services: Community, Personal Wellness and Prevention, moving on from just dispensing typical medication, and focus on human interactions.

Hannah Dunn / FOCUS / Final Major Project

Hannah Dunn / FOCUS / Final Major Project

FOCUS / / Focus is a new take on photography in the outdoors, encouraging people to be conscious of the ‘moment’, rather than concentrating on capturing the image. It’s a physical camera with a partnered smart-phone app.

Jenny Docherty / CONSCIOUS AFTERCARE / Final Major Project

Jenny Docherty / CONSCIOUS AFTERCARE / Final Major Project

CONSCIOUS AFTERCARE / / Almost 70% of the clothing we throw away could be saved by better garment care.

This range includes an aesthetically considered drying rack to encourage the gentle alternative of hang drying over tumble drying, to reduce the unnecessary disposal of damaged clothing. The partner product is a dehumidifying clothes steamer that counteracts the negative effects of wet laundry within the home.

Suraj Soren / ROBI / Final Major Projec

Suraj Soren / ROBI / Final Major Projec

ROBI / / 1.7M children die from air pollution each year. Southeast Asia is the most affected area due to large populations and concentrated industry.

Robi is an air quality pet for kids, providing clean air when pollution is dangerous. Robi’s changing mood teaches kids about air quality and uses gamification to inspire positive behaviour.

Robi will encourage the next generation to become responsible grown ups that will reduce air pollution.

Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA) Student Awards

Our second year student Olly Evans won bronze place at the IDSA Student Awards for his SteriCell (Surgical Sterilisation for Disaster Relief) project.

Olly Evans / STERICELL / Disaster Relief

Olly Evans / STERICELL / Disaster Relief

Natural disasters and violent conflict in low-income countries pose particular challenges for the sterilization of surgical instruments required for emergency medical procedures. SteriCell is a portable off-grid sterilization system that replaces large, heavy mains-powered hospital autoclaves that require plenty of clean water. A fuel cell is used to power the germicidal ultraviolet light that works in parallel with 10ml of nano titanium dioxide power, an antimicrobial technology that crystalizes titanic iron ore into a nano liquid when exposed to ultraviolet light and is two times stronger than chlorine.

Student Packaging Designer of the Year 2017 Winners

This year we had several winners at the 'Student Packaging Designer of the Year 2017' awards from our second year cohort.

Jamie Pybus / NUROFEN / Packaging Design

Jamie Pybus / NUROFEN / Packaging Design

Jamie's concept uses a clamshell inspired blister pack that removes the need for foil, and a fold out carton with enough printable space to include all information required about the product. The design greatly reduces wastage by eliminating the need for various materials and the associated logistics.

Wonjae Choi / JOHNSON'S BABY / Packaging Design

Wonjae Choi / JOHNSON'S BABY / Packaging Design

Wonjae's concept provides a seasonal pack offer for Johnson's baby bubble bath and wash. The screw cap incorporates a snow globe and bubble wand to encourage play at bath time.

Aidan Smith / TOOTHPASTE DISPENSER / Packaging Design

Aidan Smith / TOOTHPASTE DISPENSER / Packaging Design

Aidan's concept re-engineers the dispensing mechanism of standard toothpaste packaging. This ergonomic mechanism requires less twisting and squeezing of the hand, allowing greater control and accuracy when applying toothpaste to a brush.

Design for Industry 2017 Graduates

Here is a selection of the final major projects from this year's cohort...

Kieran Brookes / OGGI / Final Major Project

Kieran Brookes / OGGI / Final Major Project

OGGI / / is a personal and portable cooking system for the work place. Using an induction headed base and pressure pot, OGGI provides the option to prepare and cook fresh food in a healthy and hygienic way. This novel system will inspire more healthy and sociable choices at lunchtime.

Tom Butterfield / TLC / Final Major Project

Tom Butterfield / TLC / Final Major Project

TLC / / is a unique piece of furniture that combines three of the most essential items of furniture in the home; a table,  a light and a chair. Although it is an assemblage, each part retains its own archetypal character.

Christopher Reid / CARRYPOD / Final Major Project

Christopher Reid / CARRYPOD / Final Major Project

CARRYPOD / /  is a unique luggage system that allows the user to organise, simplify and adapt the bag to their travel needs. A modular system provides the option to compartmentalise items and make it simple to access them when travelling. Liquids, electronics and travel documents can be located in separate areas of the bag for quick access and extra security.

Daniel Genner / SUMMIT / Final Major Project

Daniel Genner / SUMMIT / Final Major Project

SUMMIT / / is a dual shell ski jacket designed to prolong life underneath an avalanche until mountain rescue teams arrive on scene. An integrated ventilation system, inflation packs, heat pads, RECCO reflectors and a Kevlar lining, enable the jacket to protect the user from the three causes of death in avalanches; asphyxiation, trauma injuries and hypothermia.

Sebastian Shaw / CHEW / Final Major Project

Sebastian Shaw / CHEW / Final Major Project

CHEW / / is a set of children's dental products. The simple design of the brush allows a child to clean their teeth through the action of chewing. The bleed holes in the case allow the brush to be rinsed through without the child having to handle the bristles. The simplicity of this design will encourage children to adopt a healthier attitude towards dental hygiene.

Design for Industry 2016 Graduates

Here is a selection of the final major projects from this years cohort...

Adam HK / WIND AND LIGHT / Final Major Project

Adam HK / WIND AND LIGHT / Final Major Project

WIND AND LIGHT / / Two established typologies are propelled into new landscapes, as both cultural and technical objects, by being consciously re-framed as electronic rather electric. The focus is not unusual electronic interactions, but subtle multi-sensory experiences, beyond the ocular-centric narrative offered by many industrially designed objects.

 

Eddie Hamilton / MILES / Final Major Project

Eddie Hamilton / MILES / Final Major Project

MILES / / is a personal computer, which uses a product-service business model to economically justify a sustainable product. The chassis is owned by the user, and the components are leased. Modular components enable simple repairs, where obsolete parts are returned to be refurbished or mined for valuable materials, creating a closed-loop material cycle.

 

Laimis / AWARE / Final Major Project

Laimis / AWARE / Final Major Project

AWARE / / targets the rising trend in cashless spending by embracing its convenience, and aims to increase awareness of spending through haptic feedback. This sensory interaction engages all of the user's senses to communicate transactions. Aware provides an engaging experience by creating a connection between digital spending and tangible outcome.

 

Tom Leslie / IN SEARCH OF ATMOSPHERE / Final Major Project

Tom Leslie / IN SEARCH OF ATMOSPHERE / Final Major Project

IN SEARCH OF ATMOSPHERE / / Everyday objects have such a profound influence on the 'atmosphere' of our environments, but often receive little attention past their aesthetics and applied function. This project takes the opportunity to prompt a conscious understanding of atmosphere and its inherent values through a considered interaction with light.

 

Callum Smith / CANOPY / Final Major Project

Callum Smith / CANOPY / Final Major Project

CANOPY / / employs technology driven design to encourage a relationship between nature, the home and its inhabitants. As homes become more temperature-controlled and air-tight, outside stimuli are muted and replaced by the hum of the air conditioner. Using passive catalytic textiles and sunlight, Canopy naturally breaks down indoor air pollutants.